Do Your Windows Need an Update?

SMflowerpots-house-window-2539Updating your windows will not only make your home look better, but will add to your home’s value. To better decide which window best fits your style, here are the various styles to choose from:

1. Double-hung. This is the most popular style. The top and bottom sashes move up and down independently, letting in more air. They’re a great option with young children or pets, since you can keep the bottom closed for safety, but open the top for ventilation. Most models have sashes that tilt in or come out for cleaning.

2. Single-hung. This very basic window opens only from the bottom. The top sash doesn’t move. They’re less expensive than double-hung, but can be hard to clean from the inside.

3. Casement. These are hinged on the side with a crank at the bottom that opens them. Older homeowners prefer casements to double-hung windows you push up and pull down. The crank also makes for easy opening in hard to reach locations, such as over a kitchen sink.

4. Sliders. This design uses panels that slide on a track. It sometimes includes a fixed middle panel, with two sliding side windows. It’s another good option for older homeowners because there’s no lifting. This style also provides great ventilation and big views.

5. Picture. This is simply a large, fixed window that gives an unobstructed picture of the view it provides. It is often combined with double-hung or casement windows on each side.

6. Bay. This style uses three windows at 35° or 45° angles. They can be fixed picture windows, casement, or double-hung. Bay windows are great in living rooms and master bedrooms, especially with a window seat. Their angled surfaces let in lots of light.

7. Bow. This is a rounded bay window. The shape is created by putting three, five, seven, or nine narrow casement, double-hung, or fixed windows at 10° angles to each other.

8. Awning. This window is hinged across the top and opens outward from the bottom. The design is good for high locations, above a door or another window.

9. Basement hopper. This is the opposite of an awning, hinged at the bottom and opening in from the top. It’s usually used to let light and air into basements.

10. Geometric. These are fixed units that come in a variety of shapes. They’re used alone as an accent, or above a large window or door. Geometrics add style and can bring light into large foyers and hallways.

Each state provide various benefits for those who update their homes for better green energy. To find out what subsidies your state offers, check out this website.

This information was provided by Danene Strand of Veritas Funding.